Adventures on a Grand Scale and the Theory of List-Making

I have always been a list-maker.

As a child I frequently made lists of my dreams and aspirations for the future. As a teenage schoolboy I distinctly remember filling my homework diary with an ever-increasing list of Latin verbs that I intended to learn, always starting tomorrow. This was an early example of the act of list-making itself replacing the action of completing the list.

Sometime in my early adult life I conceived the idea of the 7-year plan, based on the adventurous highs and lows of my father’s life. I began to believe that identifying and recording a series of desired life goals or outcomes for each 7 year period of life made their achievement much more likely. This built upon the theory of visualisation that was presented to me as a motivational tool early in my sales career.

Then, in the summer of 2014 I finally got around to compiling a Bucket List of sorts, listing a fairly random selection of the almost infinite things I wanted to do or achieve during my lifetime. Once again it seemed that by making a physical list of things that I wanted to do or achieve, they became part of an agenda and thus much more likely to happen. Seeing Pete Doherty play was a typical example – having added it to the list it went from being a vague wish to an actual plan. I followed him on Facebook, saw a reference to a guerrilla gig later the same day, and seized the opportunity. Tick.

The following list is of Adventures on a Grand Scale. Everything one does in life comes with an opportunity cost, and in all honesty I suspect that the personal cost of these adventures will prove to be too high. Nevertheless, before I die I would to spend three of my remaining years doing the following things:

  1. Spend 6 months driving around Europe in a camper van
  2. Spend 6 months driving around the USA in a camper van
  3. Spend 6 months driving around Australia/New Zealand in a camper van
  4. Spend 6 months driving around Asia in a camper van
  5. Spend 6 months sailing around the Med
  6. Spend 6 months sailing across the Pacific

To be continued.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *